What is BeOnRepeat.com

An easy, free to use service that loops Youtube videos on a infinite way. We just use public Youtube tools as documented on their website.

This site is not intended to harm or attack Youtube servers or intelectual property.

Also view count on Youtube website is not affected by looped content on this site.

Some say that meanwhile you read this lines, others loops Katy Perry clips to the infinite and further.

Please use with caution. Use speakers instead of headphones and always repeat carefully.

You want to know more? Send us an email to info@beonrepeat.com

Contact with us

Questions about YoutubeOnLoop.com? Site has been created acording to Youtube API, wich are free to use.

If you have any inquiry just send us an email to info@beonrepeat.com

We like you like it

Would you like to have even more fun? Join us on Facebook!

 

We like you like it even more

Hey!! So much repeat worth a share. Tell everyone you like our page!

Share with your friends

Copy and share this URL on Whatsapp, Telegram, Line, E-Mail...

Viking House: Full Bushcraft Shelter Build with Hand Tools | Vikings

0
00:00
We build a bushcraft viking house from the viking age using hand tools only. Inspired by vikings, who were very resourceful and created buildings using the natural materials they scavenged around them. We used simple hand tools such as axe, saw, auger, drawknife, bushcraft knife and other simple tools.
To begin with we cut cedar logs from trees that had been felled in the forest. We used an axe and saw to make log cabin notches and built the foundation of the viking house two logs high. We then used the hand auger to build the timber frame. This consisted of 3 large "A" frames. We burnt the ends of the logs in fire to evaporate any moisture and create a rot-proof layer of charred wood which will help to preserve the timber frame foundation when the poles are in the ground. We used a long cedar log as the ridge pole which sits on top of the a frame of the bushcraft shelter. The next stage was building a viking longpit or firepit. This we wanted to make as historically accurate as we could. So we dug a pit about 4 feet long and 2 feet wide. We lined the pit with large stones found in the nearby area. In order to reduce waste of any materials, we used the clay from the pit to secure the stones. We added water to the clay to make it easier to work with and we filled in the gaps between the stones. We then lit a small fire in the pit and let the clay dry out for a few days. At this point we realised we could make our job easier by building a diy saw horse. So we used the drawknife to remove bark from a log (helps to prevent rot). We used the auger to drill four holes for legs and then we made four wood pegs for the top of the saw horse. For the rafters we used more cedar logs and again burnt the ends. It is an ancient japanese technique to preserve wood which is called shou sugi ban.
It was then finally time to build the roof of the house. For this, we peeled the bark off the cedar logs. We then put this on the rafters and secured it with some roofing tacks. We had to be fast when doing this, as the cedar bark shrinks and cracks when it dries. We put it on in layers like roof tiles. We built a wood ladder to get up high on the roof and secure the final bark layers.
Using an axe and bushcraft, we made some wooden wedges and split a few large cedar logs. We then hewed these logs and built a raised viking bed for the inside of the house. We also made some benches to sit near the fire. At the back of the viking house, we built a folding window and support arm so that we could let light into the house and also improve the airflow. We dug an air vent too, to allow more oxygen to get to the fire. To make the shelter more secure, we built a perimeter wall use cedar posts and hazel saplings (also known as wattle wall). To help further improve the airflow inside the shelter, we cut a hole in the roof and built a ridge cap or ridge vent to act like a chimney and let the smoke out. Overall this viking house took about 10 days to build. It was in winter, so we were restricted by daylight hours. This is not a historically correct viking house. Traditional viking houses were built with large timbers that were hewn from big logs. They had large gable ends almost like log cabins and the roof was made from wood shingles. Often they looked like viking longships or longboats and had many decorative viking features. In a viking longhouse, there would be enough room for many people and animals as well. But this was our take on it.
We have done a number of different camping overnight trips in this shelter. We have cooked meat over fire, had great viking feasts and spent many hours keeping warm around the firepit. I hope you enjoyed this vikings inspired bushcraft build. To watch the whole series of individual episodes (where we talk and explain what we are doing) then please follow links below.

VIKING HOUSE BUILD (Each Episode): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxD9wUrrSUQojUgTowrFMJeg

Bushcraft Tools Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/BUSHCRAFTFIRES
TA Fishing Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TAFishing

SAXON HOUSE BUILD: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxAufXr4xYXLHazACE5zxnrt

GET TA OUTDOORS MERCHANDISE: https://taofficial.com
TA OUTDOORS PATCHES: https://www.taoutdoors.com/shop/

INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/taoutdoorofficial
FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/totallyawesomeoutdoors
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/OutdoorsTa

#vikings #viking #vikinghouse #bushcraft

556 repeats
370 repeats
194 repeats
193 repeats
176 repeats
141 repeats
120 repeats
119 repeats
2159 repeats
1107 repeats
827 repeats
812 repeats
705 repeats
626 repeats
583 repeats
507 repeats
Recent activity